VaccineS Do Not Cause Autism? ICAN Scores Legal Proof that CDC has Zero Evidence that HepB, Hib, PCV13 and IPV Vaccines Do Not Contribute to Autism

Step 1. FOIA CDC asking for studies showing that VaccineS Do Not Cause Autism, per their website.
Step 2. CDC refers ICAN to http://www.cdc.gov.

Step 3. ICAN goes to court!

Step 4. Judge compels release of study lists

The result? CDC Has Zero Provide Evidence that HepB, Hib, PCV13 and IPV Do Not Contribute to Autism. NOT. ONE. STUDY.

FROM THE I CAN DECIDE NETWORK:

Complaint Against the Centers for Disease Control – Vaccines and Autism

MAR 05, 2020, 17:38 ET

“The CDC claims on its website that “Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism.” Despite this claim, studies have found between 40% and 70% of parents with an autistic child continue to blame vaccines for their child’s autism, typically pointing to vaccines given during the first six months of life. Vaccines given during the first six months of life, according to the CDC’s childhood vaccine schedule, include three doses each of DTaP, HepB, Hib, PCV13 and IPV, for a total of fifteen doses during these six months. In summer 2019, ICAN submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to the CDC requesting “All studies relied upon by CDC to claim that the DTaP vaccine does not cause autism.” ICAN also submitted this same request for HepB, Hib, PCV13 and IPV, as well as requesting the CDC provide studies to support the cumulative exposure to these vaccines during the first six months of life do not cause autism.”

Watch Del lay it out on this week’s The Highwire:

Of course, we knew this already because I had read the entire literature a while back… and concluded that CDC must be using Magic to conclude the VaccineS Do Not Cause Autism.

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3 thoughts on “VaccineS Do Not Cause Autism? ICAN Scores Legal Proof that CDC has Zero Evidence that HepB, Hib, PCV13 and IPV Vaccines Do Not Contribute to Autism

  1. They (CDC) do some verbal gymnastics on their website. They answer the question of whether vaccines cause autism with (my paraphrase) “No, vaccines don’t cause autism. We’re sure because we studied the MMR and thimerosal and didn’t find any connection.” Their misdirect has been visible all along for anyone who cared to look.

    What I’d like to know is if there will be any practical implications from this. Or they going to just be allowed to keep making unsubstantiated claims — on our dime — that are then treated as absolute, unquestionable truth?

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