ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS IS (MOST OFTEN) GUILLAIN BARRE SYNDROME

The US press has been pushing a view of acute flaccid paralysis as a mysterious condition of unknown etiology (unknown cause).  Checking the scientific literature, however, tells us that AFP is most often Guillain Barre Syndrome, a condition that appears on the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program as a “Table Condition” – i.e., one that the US HHS has no defense against when parents file in the NVICP for compensation for GBS as a vaccine injury in their children.

Here are some quotes from the abstracts of a collection of studies on AFP:

“Within the last few years, an enterovirus D68 outbreak has been associated with cases of acute flaccid paralysis in children, and emerging Zika virus infection has been concurrent with cases of acute flaccid paralysis due to Guillain-Barré syndrome, although cases of myelitis have also been reported.”

“Cases (of AFP) exhibited heterogeneous paralysis patterns from 1- to 4-limb involvement, but all definite cases had longitudinal spinal gray matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (median, 20 spinal segments). Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was observed in 50 of 59 cases (85%), and 8 of 29 (28%) were positive for antiganglioside antibodies, as frequently observed in Guillain-Barré syndrome.”

“The syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a common medical emergency in children. In the era of poliomyelitis eradication, the common causes of AFP include Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), transverse myelitis and traumatic neuritis.”

“One-hundred thirty-nine children aged <15 years were reported to the Center for Diseases Control with AFP. In 138 (99%) stool samples no poliovirus was isolated. None of the patients was diagnosed as having acute poliomyelitis or polio-compatible paralysis. Guillain-Barré syndrome was the most frequent final diagnosis (79 cases) followed by Transverse Myelitis (7 cases) and Encephalitis (6 cases).”

The major clinical diagnoses associated with AFP were Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS, 40%) and encephalomyelitis/myelitis (13%).”

Guillain-Barré syndrome represented more than half of the reported cases (of AFP) (N = 2611, 52.5%), followed by traumatic neuritis (N = 715, 14.4%), and other CNS infections (N = 292, 5.9%).”

Guillain-Barré syndrome represented more than half of the reported cases (of  AFP) (N = 2611, 52.5%), followed by traumatic neuritis (N = 715, 14.4%), and other CNS infections (N = 292, 5.9%).

“Of these (cases of AFP), nineteen (45%) cases were classified as Guillain-Barré syndrome on both registries.”

“In 44.5% of cases (of AFP) the definite diagnosis was Guillain Barrè syndrome.”

Guillain-Barre syndrome dominated among non-polio AFP (39.3% of cases); more rare were traumatic neuritis (27.9% of cases), transient monoparalysis (12.1%), myelitis (7.6%).”

“A neurological cause was identified in 67.5% of cases (of AFP), of which the most common was Guillain-Barre syndromee (42%), followed by transverse myelitis (15%)”

The major clinical diagnosis associated with AFP were Guillain-Barre syndrome (30.2%), central nervous system infection (16.2%), transverse myelitis (10.6%) non-polio enterovirus infection (6.2%), and hypokalaemic paralysis (5.2%).”

“Among (AFP cases), Guillain-Barré syndrome (118 cases, 41.5% of all non-polio AFP cases), traumatic neuritis (63 cases, 22.2%), transient monoparesis of limb (35 cases, 12.3%), myelitis (26 cases, 9.2%) were registered most frequently.

“To describe the epidemiology and causes of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Australian children, and the clinical features of the two most common causes of AFP, Guillain-Barré syndrome and transverse myelitis.”

The most common causes of AFP were Guillain-Barré syndrome in 67 (47%) and transverse myelitis in 27 (19%)”

Guillain-Barré syndrome was the commonest single cause of AFP.”

“…acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) attributed to a peripheral demyelinating process (Guillain-Barré Syndrome [GBS]), or to an anterior myelitis.”

Additional Information:

How to file your vaccine injury in VAERS

How to file a case in the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program

AFP IS GBS ABSTRACTS <<< download the abstracts

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS IS (MOST OFTEN) GUILLAIN BARRE SYNDROME

  1. As many of us have suspected, most of these cases of paralysis are likely to be vaccine injuries, although the Ministry of Truth will never allow this to be printed or broadcast. Clustering in late summer and fall, just like polio. Amusing phrase, “the era of poliomyelitis eradication.” Change the name and it will go away, like magic! Yet back it has roared, and the poor CDC just doesn’t know why.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The absurdity of this discussion is that we’re just talking about symptoms. GBS is symptoms so it’s nonsense to say that it is the cause. The natural instinct of scientists is to put things in boxes, and GBS is one of many boxes related to muscle weakness and paralysis. Talking about symptoms isn’t talking about real causes. We know that vaccines can cause GBS (and related syndromes) but also pesticides. And perhaps adverse reactions to pharmaceuticals, and who knows what else. The WHO’s count of global AFP cases has been above 100,000 a year for several years now. But all they care about is the same symptoms with a virus present (polio). They can eliminate polio, which was originally an effort to ride the world of paralysis, while the number of cases of paralysis are increasing.

    Like

    1. GBS is a formal diagnosis based on symptoms (see ICD-10-CM Code G61.0). Since AFP is most often ultimately diagnosed as GBS, how absurd of the media to present AFP is disease of mysterious and unknown origin.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s